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a lady who bought a couple of units and wanted my opinion years ago. she had an old victorian with an old brick foundation. she was absolutely convinced that the foundation had to be concrete and had to be concrete tomorrow. it was the first thing she did. she had different people, and look at the way she could do it. someone convinced her she should really be fit up and do it to the degree that she could add another unit or another living space down the line it see -- if she so chose. against my advice, she probably spent over $100,000 on pouring concrete down there. it sits there as an empty shell of a basement, which is sort of useless, really. i think you can get expert opinions from many different people, and the value question is a different question than an expert opinion on a particular subject. the value question is a question of the value of the property. is it over-improving? sometimes the contractor will tell you otherwise. the value is probably for a salesperson. >> that is something john wrote out. what value? value to you? value to the appraiser who comes in in one month? v
from( rv three units down to two units. and a notice of special restrictions were recorded but recorded against the>c9kñz the wrong property description so that my clients, when they bought the property some years later, had no notice of the notice of special restrictions reducing the property building count from three units to two.ap3y since ouruaüearing we discovered pg&e documents clearly showing that after that notice of special restriction wasoa recorded and after the building permit wasés%( issued reducing it from three k,8ñ units to two units pg&e was issued permits to install four electrical meters on the property, three gas meters on the property and we alsoy:::wx have uncovered, from the department of building inspection records,? .b its own certificate ofm?g completion and occupancya nzl in 1980 -- excuse me, in 1999, years following the previous@$jpd owner's building permit reducing it from three units to two. i'd like to show you this, if i could. this:jp$e÷ document clearly says the certificate of
american community as we kickoff the year of italian culture in the united states and we look forward to joining hands with you to make it as successful as possible. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> all right. and please consider me one of "us". >> thank you very much. and bona tale. i asked senator leno how do you think they say happy chanukkah in italian? and he said mozel tough and i am glad to be here and i am proud to be an italian american and it's been an important part of my identity. i believe i have the soul in my heart. [applause] . so there you are. and i remember my grandfather saying when he came over on the boat he was told the streets of america were paved with gold and found out there were no streets and he had to do the paving, and i think the strongest part of our culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son
on the united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution to the jurisprudence is his renowned commentary on the constitution. eminently quoted joseph story famously incorrectly declared, quote, a constitution of government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation and of quote. this lecture series celebrates the legacy into law. prior to the joseph story lectures have been and judge robert bork, professor john harrison at the university school of law, judge raymond randolph of the united states court of appeals for the d.c. circuit, and last year chief justice of the united states court of appeals for the sixth circuit. tonight we are honored to have a fifth name to the prestigious list as we welcome justice anthony kennedy who will deliver this evening's joseph story distinguished lecture on the topic, t
in the united states and see what their efforts are. i want to begin with jeanne robinson, chief financial officer of first book. if you could describe what it is to start. >> yes, i just want to say thank you to c-span for all the support you've given tdi or industry and reading, literacy. c-span has been a leader on that and it's wonderful just to salute you. first book is a nonprofit and provides books and educational material to programs, serving cantonese, classroom serving kids in need across the united states. >> how to shoot it started and where the future funding from? >> we started 20 years ago. in fact, were celebrating her 100 millionth book distributed this week, probably when this airs, it will have been last week. we started 20 years ago at martha's table in washington d.c. we have distributed more and more as the years have gone by because we started a new remodel. in recent years redistributed 10 million, 11 million a year. we support programs across the united states is now over 40,000. our funding comes from corporate cause marketing campaigns we do as well as individual
but transfer that to our country of the united states so i know they're going to start those events in washington dc with their celebrations but let us san francisco celebrate -- mayor aleato and our wonderful history here and allow us to do a preliminary launch and so that's what we're attempting to do tonight and celebrate with you this launch of italian culture. it's very meaningful for us to did that year. we have a lot to celebrate. let me just say that painters, scrptdures, poets, musicians, designers, mathematicians, great architects of the italian country have come here to san francisco. we have experienced so much of the italian talent here in san francisco. that's why we wanted to be celebrating here and i am so glad to be joined not only by senator leno and assembly man amaino and david chiu and scott wiener as well. they all want to get in on this great celebration because it's wonderful for our city. i have often said our city and our strength is our international status and we do that with all the sister cities, with all of the flag raisings, but this is kind of
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
now the code-liaison to the alcohol licensing unit. my partner is here. charlie, would you introduce yourself? he is my partner. what we do is run the daily operations of the unit. we are also the sounding board for them when it comes to the various type of permits and licenses we may be having difficulties with. i have my units working with the permit officers at those stations, who are the first line, reporting directly to their captains. i wanted to say that my highest priority is public safety. when we review an application for a new venue, be it entertainment, a bar, or a night club, it is very important that we look at the impact the venue will have on the neighborhood, and the community itself. however, i must also keep in mind and be aware of entrepreneurship and small business owners as the backbone of our city. they had a lot to the culture and flavor of san francisco and we do not want to lose that. we take these factors into consideration. ultimately be want everyone to have an enjoyable and safe time when they go out after hours to enjoy the city at night. that is my vie
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
we talk about here and respect and dignity and a woman in the united states is dependent and has been on security of winning a career that can always be the end with no maternity leave, way behind other countries where the mother did not even hear about the percentage to leave and a woman dreaming about a career. not to fear when she goes to an interview to imagine she has children because that would be the end of having a chance. thank you. >> thank you. >> i will be happy to do that. talked-about -- i have always gotten up at 4:30 or 5:00 but when i get up, i happen to have a son who has grown up now show when i get up 4:30 to 5:00 he is off living his life. my husband and i have always been in similar careers so that really helps a lot. but over the years i have made joyces in terms of what was in the half way i was on in order to create the flexibility for me to raise our son and i do think that is so very important. the one thing i will say about the university's and rider and speak about mine, we do have more family friendly policies because we have not just maternity leave the
that is that the fund has helped stabilize 49 below market rate units at 333 harrison, the new rincon green project in rincon hill. the rents for these units are deeply affordable for families making 30% ami or less. the rents start at $550 for studios and $6 94 for two bedrooms. the fund also supported the bill for our housing program, a project of veterans equity center to help south of market residents and workers actually fill out often these complicated housing applications and the ones for rincon green. [speaker not understood] to fit 149 eligible families in the south of market throughout the month of october and they've helped another 190 south of marketes are didn't and workers making 40 to 60% of ami fill out applications for future development. the lottery for rincon green was actually this morning and we are hoping that many of our families were selected. this is a concrete example of how this fund has been used to stabilize the residents and families in our community. so, i wanted to introduce from the mayor's office of housing claudine to talk about this round of funding and how it is
in reciting the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the president pro tempore: the majority leader. mr. reid: would the chair announce the business for the day. the president pro tempore: under the previous order the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order the senate will be in a period of morning business until 1:30 p.m. for debate only, with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. durbin: mr. president? the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: after any statement by the majority leader, i'd ask consent to be recognized in morning business. the president pro tempore: without objection. mr. durbin: it is my understanding the majority leader is going to yield the floor to me at this moment. the president pro tempore: the senator from illinois. mr. durbin: mr. president, the state of nevada was admitted to the union in 1864. since 1864 there have
. and the fights ahead of us are fights that we're very well positioned for and we're very united about and that's spending. and we've got the sequester vote, the continuing resolution vote and the debt ceiling vote in front of us. and if the president thinks that he's not going to negotiate, he better think again. he's president of the united states, he's not emperor of the planet. we'll have to see the spending cuts and entitlement reforms he's talked about. i take him at his word, said he'd like to put them on the table, we haven't seen them. i'm looking forward to seeing them literally in a matter of days. this next 90 days is going to be really critical for restoring the fiscal stability of the country. >> i want to ask you, you just mentioned you guys are united but last night it was a rarity, house speaker john boehner voted for the plan, majority leader eric cantor voted against it, as did kevin mccarthy, his chief whip. does that send a message to the chuckle head as your colleague said? if boehner and cantor is split, there's no reason we can't oppose the big deal? >> i'm proud of the
the prince will yamd serve as a rescue pilot. his unit got call 15 minutes into the new year to help find a man that was swept to sea while walking his dog on a pier in england. the chopper crew braved 50 mile-an-hour winds. >> at least make a difference to someone. they are in trouble, you try to get there. >> his wife was celebrating with her family and they eventually called off the search for the man. >>> viewers are amazed at hannah's come back at rose parade. it was a few weeks she was severely burned at her home. >> on december 11th, espn she was making dinner at her home. she lifted the burners on pro obtain gear and the wind had blown out the fire. >> so i turned the gas off. i went to re-ignite and there was an explosion. >> hannah told the story on gma today. co-hosting the event was first time back. she suffered first-degree burns on her neck and face and second-degree burns on her injured left hand. it also singed her hair. >> i spent an hour in makeup and i have false eyelashes. this is all fake hair. as the hard road for burn victims. i was by far the most fortunate person
by commissioner murase or mendoza. >> whereas san francisco became the birth place of the united nations with the signing of the u.n. charter at the war memorial veterans building in 1945 and annually december 10th marks international human rights day to celebrate the universal declaration of human rights, the first achievement. united nations. and whereas the san francisco-based foundation founded by the legendary rock band the grateful dead has advanced education about the universal declaration of human rights among youth and adults called the world it's could be." and whereas by delivering human rights curriculum to the creative arts the groundbreaking curriculum is designed to engage youth, inspire learning and critical thinking and positive social interaction, encourage youth who are often marginalized due to learning or physical differences to enjoy participation in school-wide events, engage the broader community to celebrate accomplishments of youth and showcase the importance and value of creative arts to personal development and vibrant culture. providing collaboration opportun
's not been obvious to many governments around the world. the government of the united kingdom that spent a decade asking and promoting what it saw as nonviolent islamist extremist groups under the theory that only they could talk to the and dissuade violent extremists only to income in the end, the end of the blair period, that the shared world view was disastrous, and that, obviously, they should be backing antiextremists, individuals, and arguments. chambers' story, as has been said, is not the story of the loss of faith, but the acceptance of faith, christianity. in the current islamic case, the analogy is not perfect, but there is an analogy. after all, chambers was born into a faith and culture of christianity, in and around new york, in the first decade of the 20th century. he did not, in the end, adopt some foreign religion, but his own religion. that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamists convert to a foreign religion, but rather claim islam of their own ancestors, one unpoisenned by the extremism we associate with al-qaeda. the problem for us is tha
or it will have a huge drag on the united states economy. once again, revisit the issue for the first time in american history. it is not a perfect package. it is something that gets us by while we tackle the large issues in the next congress. >> we are confronted with a bill that, if the vote full voting- age allow us to go over the ceiling or we can try to come together and pass something that neither tside of the aisle will agree with 100 percent. -- 100%. we do not have to can to new fighting. we have got to make sure parrot what i fin. maybe we are moving in the right direction and maybe we are moving toward -- forward. >> we expect them back any minute now. we do not know yet exactly what all happened -- what will happen. what we are hearing from several different sources is the rules committee is going to bring it up and it will be a straight up or down vote on the senate bill. the house will come back into session any minute now. off.ight have to cut an let's hear more voices. here are tweets -- let's hear voices on the phone. linda, what do you think? >> i do not think they know h
parlors to traffic women and children throughout the united states, so i really urge you to say yes to this and if there's any other questions i can answer for you, i will gladly do that. >> thank you, lieutenant. commissioner kingsley. commissioner loftus, i'm sorry. >> go ahead. lieutenant, thank you very much. just your few minutes here are very informative. i'm wondering what exactly will be done with the $200,000. >> what we're looking to do is increase the investigations. it's very time-consuming. the elements to discover human trafficking, it can come in different forms. it can be a deaf domestic violence call that results in us finding human trafficking. we have some stats for you regarding what was investigated and at this point last year we had 107 cases that were investigated. we had 74 identified victims of human trafficking. that was just law enforcement based, a total of 369 victims were identified through services provided through agency-specific legal outreach or other services. what we're trying to do is work in cooperation with them so the police department
, was their ability to compromise. the very structure of this institution, the united states congress, the very structure of our institution, which joined the people's house, where we are all privileged to serve, with the united states senate, was known as what? the connecticut compromise, or the great compromise. that is the very basis of our founders. too often we forget that while we should never, we should never compromise our principles, we must always, mr. speaker, we must always be prepared to compromise in the service of our principles. a couple weeks ago, "the economist" described another example of compromise -- this one that justice brandeis described as "one of the laboratories of democracy." the state of georgia. conservative republican governor, are former house colleague, and the liberal mayor of atlanta, are clearly at opposite ends of the political spectrum. yet they have managed to bridge the divide with a commitment to results. mr. speaker, together they have achieved significant gains for the good of georgia. mr. speaker, congress and the white house are perfectly capable of
of the united nations, world leaders from 193 countries are gathering for the annual meeting of the general assembly. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the assembly on wednesday. he had some blistering words today. >> you have been condemned very vociferously in america for a comment you have said to have made, that you wanted israel to be wiped off the map, wiped off the face of the earth. there have been many different interpretations what you said. you have disputed the meaning that was then translated from the original farsi. let me give you the opportunity to say exactly what you did say and to say exactly what you did mean. >> translator: we have been condemned in the united states for many things, for having deposed a dictator with the revolution, for having sought freedom and free elections, for not allowing our oil and national treasure to leave our country freely and for having stood up to very dangerous terrorists in the region, for having stood up against saddam hussein, who enjoyed the backing of many we stood up against him and did not allow the occupation of our terr
abouted day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but so-called first among equals. they project the date is somewhere around 2030. your thoughts and reckoning on the date and whether or not you agree with that, if you will, not decline, ascension of other powers? >> right. i certainly think that since the financial crisis back in 2007 and 2008, there has been a tendency to write us down, if you will. you think many of those assessments have been unduly pessimistic. i think even down right wrong at times. we're still the most powerful economy in the world. there is still have most powerful military. demographic i canly we're quite a healthy nation. we are the third most populous nation in the world and we will be even out to 2050. so the notion that somehow we're going to be eclipsed from the scene, i think is completely wrong. there is some truth to the statement that the economic and demographic center of gravity in the world is shifting towards asia. but it is shifting towards asia away from europe if you will. and not away from the united states. and i think tha
and has people scratching their heads. the united states of america, while everybody's patting themselves on the back, we just added 4 trillion more dollars to the national debt. >> on every one of your substantive points, you're right. this is a bad bill that made a bad situation worse. the only thing that's reassuring to the rest of the world was simply that it avoided going over the cliff. so all the substance, all the details are bad. you've got to ultimately deal with entitlements. this did nothing. you've got to deal with economic growth. this did nothing. the only thing it did was avoided sending the signal that we really are reckless and out of control. >> we are reckless. we are out of control. and mark halperin, this is what's so stunning to me. is you look at the things we have to take care of over the next 20 years. and we have to take care of it now, or else seniors suffer really disproportionately over the next decade. social security. medicare, medicaid, entitlements. nothing touched there. no, it was going to be touched. the president even said, he told david gregory, yeah
. the united nations reporting today that more than 60,000 people have likely died in the nearly two year long conflict. this is on the same day a military airstrike reportedly killed or wounded dozens more outside the nation's capitol. war planes bombed a gas station in a damascus suburb destroying a number of cars and buildings. we cannot verify the authenticity of this film but rebel forces are attempting to thwart the overwhelming air power. leland is live in the middle east. why are the rebels mounding the new push now? >>reporter: they feel they can make a difference on the ground in this fight. the trump card for the syrian regime has been the air power, bombing rebel conditions and use gunships and fly in resupply missions. the rebels feel if they can capture the airfields in the north they can control that territory. that is what we are seeing, advances on airfields in the north with coordinated attacks on three airfields. the rebels are better armed and coordinated and using methods to move forward. the disturbing part of the video many of the fighters were the best warriors we have
don't think there's been retaliation. but in the shortest way possible, the united states has said it will consider the extent of the damage done regardless of how it's done. whether it's done by a missile or a cyberattack. and we'll retaliate appropriately depending upon who did it and what they did, not how they did it. with regard to the weapons systems, the f-35 that you mentioned, vast amounts of the code for the f-35 systems were stolen before the plane ever flew. so, stolen by friendly asian government. [laughter] you may well think that in the future, if there were a war, if , weapons systems might roll out onto the battlefield and not work. >> thank you very much. we're out of time. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> point we've seen over the years is not just economics, it's the discomfort that investigative reporting often causes in a news room. because it's troublesome. it's that more than the economics. if you're going to ruffle the feathers of somebody powerful, that
of the film and tv productions staying in the united states got a tax break, for example, also a tax break for the area or special tax is it the us for areas around the world trade center site. as we always have in very big legislation and important legislation, these things get tucked in there because they guarantee easier passage and some of them quite frankly are just extended, they're just almost like carbon copy extenders of things we have done before that have been languishing this year without a budget so the fiscal cliff bill, like all legislation, packed with these goodies. there's one thing in there that the business community is very, very interested in and i'd like to point out that to you, extension of modification of bonus depreciation. businesses can write off immediately half the value of their new investments, known as the 50% bonus depreciation. this is something that got business people, raised their attention. listen to what ned riley had to say about this. >> businesses have been holding off and waiting for the uncertainty of the fiscal cliff. we saw a nice bonus depre
of the un, to stop this conflict. >> the united nations has expressed concern that the rising toll of atrocities committed by both the government and rebel -- concern at the rising toll of atrocities committed by both the government and rebel forces. >> the u.s. has narrowly avoided economic meltdown. they have passed a deal to prevent huge tax heights -- hikes and spending cuts. under the current agreement, taxes will rise four american households making nearly half a million dollars, -- will rise for american households making nearly half a million dollars. talks on deep spending cuts have been delayed for almost two months. >> the u.s. pulled back from the dreaded cliff. 257 representatives voted for the deal. 167, most republican, voted against. a short time later, president obama stepped before the press. at his side, vice president joe biden. biden was instrumental in getting both sides to compromise. >> thanks to the votes of democrats and republicans in congress, i will sign a law that raises taxes on the wealthiest 2% of americans while preventing a middle-class tax hike t
to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live, 23-foot christmas tree and it is covered with 10,000 pieces of oragami and most of it is white cranes and all of the white cranes on the tree are inscribed with people's wish and hopes for the world. merilee put out an invitation that goes out virally through the internet and we ask people what they want for the future of the world and share it with us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is
they thought about him. looking live at new york city, home of the united nations. world leaders from 93 countries are gathering for a meeting. president mahmoud ahmadinejad will address the meeting, with blistering words. >> you have been condemned strongly in america for a comment you are said to have made that you wanted israel to be wiped off the map. wiped off the face of the earth. there would be many different interpretations of what you said. you have disputed the meaning that was then translated from the original farsi. let me give you this opportunity to say exactly what you did say, and to say exactly what you did mean. >> we have been condemned in the united states for many things. for having deposed a dictator with the revolution. for having sought freedom and free elections. for not allowing our oil and national treasure to leave our country freely. in -- for having stood up to very dangerous terrorists in the region. for having stood up against saddam hussein who enjoyed the back of many, we stood up against him. we have been condemned for a great many things because we sa
complicated. as a result, if it were an industry, it would be the largest in the united states and would consume 6.1 billion hours, the equivalent of more than 3 million full-time workers. yes, it is too costly. taxpayers spent -- spent 163 billion complying with the individual and corporate income tax rolls. add to that the fact that the u.s. has the highest corporate tax rate, and an outdated worldwide system of taxation and not to -- it is not too difficult to imagine why many do not view america as an attractive place to hire and invest. nothing about the bill we are considering tonight changes the realities. that is why the ways and means committee will pursue tax recovery of the tax reform in the next congress. -- will pursue tax reform in the next congress. i urge my colleagues to support this bill and get us one step closer to tax reform. i reserve my time. >> the gentleman's time is referred -- reserved. >> this is a bipartisan bill, and i will try to keep it within that spirit to the extent possible. as we are here today on january 1, hours away from people, americans returning
to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie endowment for national peace. he emphatically denied chambers's allegation. a great deal more than the reputations of these two men was at stake. if this was innocent, anti communism, and those closely associated with the like richard nixon. it was dealt a devastating blow. if alger hiss was guilty, anti communism would occupy a prominent part of the political landscape, and his spokesman would become national leaders. furthermore, chambers and alger hiss each represented one side in the epic struggle of the cold war. one man symbolized the philosophy of freedom and western civilization. the other the ideology of totalitarianism and marxism and leninism. both left and right understood that america and the world was at a critical point in history. considered a major political events had transpired between august of 1948 when chambers confronted alger hiss at a congressional hearing. in may of 1952 when chambers published his managerial and m
and see what happens. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer in for piers morgan. this is a real nail-biter we're watching, despite a threat by some republicans to add an amendment to the bill, an amendment that would have added over $300 billion in spending cuts and would have forced the bill back to the senate. the house is now on the verge of simply voting up or down on the senate bill as it stands. the package would increase taxes on individuals making more than $400,000 a year and couples making more than $450,000 a year. it would also extend unemployment insurance for a year for some 2 million people. and that house vote is expected to come this hour. we're watching it very closely. let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana bash on capitol hill. she has the very latest on what's going on. dana, i take it they started the actual debate, the vote could be fairly soon? >> they have started the debate on the procedural issues, but i just actually am getting an e-mail right now saying that the final vote, it doesn't lo
the united states. and certain cities were really feeling the heat. preliminary data from the national weather service found that at least 30 major cities have broken or tied their previous record last year. they include dallas, houston, detroit, st. louis and chicago. >>> time, now, for the weather across the nation. light snow from the dakotas across the great lakes. showers and thunderstorms from southern texas to jacksonville, savannah and charleston. south carolina has the coldest morning in the northeast. >> new york and boston, doesn't even warm up to the freezing mark. mostly 20s from detroit to fargo. >> miami. >>> coming up, the richest of the rich. new names topping a list of the world's billionaires. >>> plus, apple's elves hard at work. signs of an all-new iphone after the start of the year. >>> and espn's hannah storm i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers a
in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world wit
it laboratory example. you have marines on the westside of the reservoir, army unit on the eastside. you have the first division reverse a 50,000 marines on the west and south sides. it's comparing decisions made by generals. in this case, not all cases, want to save general scales of these here tonight, if not all cases did we do better than the army. in this case they did, clearly. opie smith makes a series of smart decisions, even though he has mom and i macarthur pushing him in the wrong direction and a reckless fashion. the army unit on the east side of chosin reservoir. people forget this. 90% casualty rate. survivors only survived if they were able to stagger on the ice at the reservoir and walked down to the marines launch for most of this out. and because a little-known marine colonel went out with some corman and marines over the course of several days and pulled in the laudable and 80 pounds diapering around on the ice. cheney soldiers watched. they could've shot them them at any time. i like this marine colonel, blinking on missing because he was a relief pitcher in the modern age
is ann thornton and i am making these statements as i have an interest in the unit across the street, 129 and 131 fillmore street. and i would like to argue against giving more time on this garage. on 20 -- 10-24 the board -- thiferred extension to construct his garage. appellant is claiming his disabilities justify construction of the garage and explain why p4he's taken so long to move on[" our position is that the reason he did=" project was not due to his disabilities but working on his illegal conversion of a three unit building to a hotel a change he got approved after the fact of they& controversial before the planning commission in september 2011. when the commission split on the ex-facto approval of the post conversion of his building to an sro. by the way it was not a unanimousgzj9 hearing. our reasons for joining appellant !z deborah stott and reviewing the variance are these. this building permit was based on the assumption that the three story automatic garage was a separate structure and add
the united states department of justice's office of violence against women, encourage arrest policies and enforcement of protection orders program, for grant period april 1, 2012 through march 31, 2014. >> thank you very much for this item. we have emilie from the department of status of women. >> good morning, supervisor chu. good morning, supervisor kim. i'm joined today by tara anderson, grant [speaker not understood] from the district attorney and [speaker not understood] from our department. i just wanted to share with you the commission just finished three community meetings with our partners in the violence against women prevention and intervention grants program. these are direct service providers who work on a daily basis with the domestic violence victim. we held the community meeting at [speaker not understood]. we held some at the department for all of our agencies and at cameron house. and the themes that we heard over and over again were language barriers continue to persist when victim of domestic violence want to report a crime or follow-up on a crime, that cultural ba
, mandating the most aggressive green building standards for private construction anywhere in the united states. and showcasing them in this new building. >> the city for the sfpuc, it was critical that the building stay as a lead building. the easiest thing to do to cut out millions of dollars, let's just go from lead platinum to lead gold. but that wasn't the objective. this needed to be the best example of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when the project was at a stand still for a number of reasons, largely due to budget issues. and at the time we were asked to consider an alternative design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea.
years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the united states attorney is envisioned by this administration. this administration, the president, attorney general holder, they want the u.s. attorneys to go out into the attorney to talk to the communities in our district to understand what the issues are and challenges are and to do what we can to
or movie is shot in an economically depressed area of the united states. there's a subsidy for rum made in puerto rico. a tax break if you train a mine rescue worker, and a tax credit for every kilowatt of electricity produced by the wind. all told, a fiscal cliff law designed to reduce the deficit added $74 billion in spending through changes in the tax law. do you consider this pork? >> oh, absolutely. this was filled with pork. >> reporter: republican congressman darrell issa, who voted no on the bill, says many house members felt blindsided by tax breaks that were never publicly debated. >> and it's pork particularly because they couldn't get these through any other way except by throwing them into a bill like this. >> reporter: but supporters of the tax provision say they will create jobs. dan houser of the international speedway corporation, the owner of nascar, says faster tax writeoffs will lead to more investment in tracks and in stadiums. >> it's not a tax break. what it's doing is it's creating shovel-ready capital investment in communities that desperately need jobs. >> repo
. the president of the united states starting with the state of the union last year focused on raising taxes and talked about it as the way to solve the deficit problem and talked about the buffett rule in 70santly and campaigned on raising taxes on the wealthy and gave the american people the impression that he could take serious steps toward resolving our fiscal issues by raising taxes. now, taxes have been raised. done mostly what he wanted us to do. the focus now has to be on spending. i think the president can't very well say we need more revenues and we need to raise taxes. we have done that. now, the focus really has to be on spending. >> bret: if you looked at his deficit and debt commission, the simpson bowles commission and recommendations that came out of there and what has not been followed through now two years ago, is remarkable. >> he is not interested in that. he is not interested in cutting spending. i think if you look at this in the large view it is becoming clear who he is and what he wants to do. he is now in the is second term. he is liberated and he can be open about w
now on, they are united against the president's increased spending and the president's efforts to increase taxes, as well. >> grover norquist, i think this is not the last battle. not the last battle. >> it's the beginning. >> thank you very much. >>> coming up next on "andrea mitchell reports," the latest on hillary clinton's health. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton is still receiving treatment today at a new york hospital for a blood clot in her head. diagnosed after a follow-up mri following a concussion suffered in a fall several weeks ago. joining me now, nbc's chief science and health correspondence, bob bazell. and also with me "the washington post" ruth marcus. first to you, where this clot was found, a follow-up mri we were told on sunday night, and we were told it was a clot stemming from the concussion from the fall. does that mean that the clot was necessarily caused by the concussion or could it be from an underlying condition, or is there no way to really know that fact? >> it may have been caused by both of those problems. sometimes there's sort of a perfec
going to be the source of last resort for every natural calamities that happened in the united states of america? it is we are going to change the constitution because the constitution does not authorize it. it has been in the past so i understand the argument. i have friends and relatives who suffered with sandy. i myself, my farm in new jersey suffered with sandy but when the government decides to give away tens of billions of dollars and to make it more palatable to those who represent people in district other than once hit by sandy, more important to, we are back to where we started. spending money we don't have. having no discipline. operating the government outside the confines of the constitution. republicans who voted in favor of this last night gave a green light to that kind of behavior. sandy is a unique and discrete issue that involves a matter of life and death. letting the president spend money that he doesn't have, raising taxes and getting spending concessions from him in return is another issue, one that will devour us in the future. connell: the next round on this if
united together to provide that hope for the american public. >> reporter: republican outrage is personal and pointed at the house speaker for aabruptly canceling the vote in congress. >> the speaker, for some reason, is taking it out on new york and long island and new jersey and it's a disgrace. >> reporter: what did happen? >> eric cantor had promised a vote on the aid package before the lame duck session ended. >> the motion is adopted without objection to reconsider is laid on the table. >> reporter: but sources tell cnn right after the toxic fiscal cliff vote the house speak joern cliff vote the house speak joe n janua yanked the bill. >> reporter: the reason? cnn told the speaker he worried it was bad internal politics for him to allow a vote on $60 million after a long day of getting pommelled for spending. >> on a political chest board of politics our people were played last night as a pawn. >> i called the speaker four times last night after 11:20 and he did not take my calls. it is why the american people hate congress. it's why they hate them. >> reporter: and this meeting tha
that this deal in the united states senate got 89 vote, which is very difficult to do and has polarized washington environment. vice president joe biden also up here today making a second trip to capitol hill in less than 24 hours. his messages house democratics, we need you to get behind the deal that he had negotiated bottom line, house democrats are essentially saying it's time to move forward. >> vice president biden has worked very hard to come to a compromise. by definition, a compromise has elements in it that each party does not like. but by definition, it has things in it that each party should like. so essentially what the house democrats are saying this got 89 votes in the united states senate. huge bipartisan support. it should be voted on as is, rick. >> rick: all of this happens, mike, as we are about ready to close the book on this congress, right? >> that's right. we are less than 48 hours from a new congress being sworn in. so the clock is clearly ticking. there is also the concern about how the worldwide markets will react to this uncertainty. so that is why some house
of the syrian civil war. just last week, the same united nations left more or less wringing its hands, its diplomats saying talking is the only way out of this bleed stalemate but nobody wants to talk seriously. neither side wants to talk directly to the other at all right now. >> sreenivasan: in another development, the family of american journalist james foley announced he's missing in syria. he was seized by gunmen, near the turkish border, in late november. in india, several thousand women staged a new protest over the gang-rape of a 23-year-old medical student, who died of her injuries. the protesters held a silent march in new delhi, to the gandhi memorial. they called for reforms in the justice system and a national focus on sexual violence. the six suspects in the gang rape and murder are to be formally charged tomorrow. the u.s. coast guard kept close watch today on a grounded oil drilling barge in the gulf of alaska. the royal dutch shell barge was being towed monday night when it broke loose in stormy conditions. since then, rough seas have hampered efforts to board the drilling
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